Thursday, September 9, 2010

Move According to Your Opponent



I've studied karate a little bit. Enough to know most people, including six year olds, can kick my butt. But, in addition to the physical conditioning, the philosophy of it has always fascinated me and I've found most of it applicable to self defense in any form. So for today while I'm still out on the road, some things to think about.

20 Shotokan Karate Philosophy precepts:


1) Karate training is more than just the dojo

2) Training begins and ends with a bow of respect

3) Never attack first unnecessarily

4) The practioner follows a just route

5) Know about yourself before you can know others

6) Spiritual development is the first focus, and then later technical ability

7) Empty or release your mind

8) The lazy will not have good fortune

9) Lifelong journey and training

10) Use karate principles in everything

11) Karate like hot water, needs heat otherwise it cools

12) Do not think that you must win, but alternatively that you dont have to lose

13) Victory can come from knowing how to differentiate vulnerable points from invulnerable ones.

14) Move according to your opponent

15) Respect your opponents hands and legs as being like sharp swords

16) Be alert to opponents in all areas

17) Ready positioning for beginners and natural position for advanced

18) Kata and real fighting are different entities

19) Strength and weakness of power, expansion and contraction of body, speed and slowness of technique

20) Devise at all times

5 comments:

  1. 1) Cardio
    2) Beware of Bathrooms
    3) Seatbelts
    4) Doubletap
    5) No attachments
    6) Travel in a group
    7) Keep the Dumbdumbs close at hand
    8) Kill with efficiency
    10) Be quiet
    15) Know your way out
    17) Don't be a hero
    18) Limber up
    19) Blend in
    20) Find the right shelter
    21) Zombies can't climb
    22) Be ruthless
    23) God bless rednecks
    24) No drinking
    31) Check the back seat
    32) Enjoy the little things

    ReplyDelete
  2. That was my general take after studying Tae Kwon Do, but then I went into some of the SE Asian/Indonesian Martial Arts and learned that Agression, Ruthlessness, and a weapon (not necessarily a gun) make a hell of a lot of difference.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very thought provoking rules - even to live by...would be good guidelines to present to my boys who are typically always on defense. The checkers? Beautiful parallel as always B.

    ReplyDelete
  4. 1) Keep breathing
    2) High and low
    3) Check all the corners
    4) Centre of mass
    5) Know where your spare is
    6) Never in first
    7) Watch out for the guy behind
    8) 3 makes sure
    10) Check your laces
    15) Check your straps and buckles
    17) You don't walk away from a leg wound
    18) Keep calm
    19) Know your target
    20) Car doors don't stop bullets
    21) Never leave by the way you came in
    22) Think about it tomorrow
    23) Dummy's die
    24) Keep hydrated
    31) Watch their hands
    32) Long waits and short moments of activity.
    33) Good prep is key to survival
    34) Practise practise practise!

    ReplyDelete
  5. From the "Book of Five Rings"

    1) Do not think dishonestly.
    2) The way is in training.
    3) Become acquainted with every art.
    4) Know the Ways of all professions.
    5) Distinguish between gain and loss in worldly matters.
    6) Develop intuitive judgment and understanding for everything.
    7) Perceive those things which cannot be seen.
    8) Pay attention even to trifles.
    9) Do nothing which is of no use.

    You should not have a favorite weapon. To become over-familiar with one weapon is as much a fault as not knowing it sufficiently well.

    It is necessary to maintain the combat stance in everyday life and to make your everyday stance your combat stance.

    The primary thing when you take a sword in your hands is your
    intention to cut the enemy.

    It is difficult to move strong things by pushing directly, so you
    should "injure the corners".

    Use all your weapons, it would be very shameful to die with one of ones
    swords unsheathed.

    ReplyDelete

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