Sunday, October 25, 2009

Battle Foods


"The Drop Scone was one of the most feared of the battle breads -- heavy enough to do serious damage if dropped from a height of six inches, and aerodynamic enough to stun an opponent at a distance if hurled from a sling. A variant was designed to shatter on impact, scything the surrounding area with razor-sharp crumbs.
Witches Abroad - Terry Pratchett.

These however, would probably not do any damage, other than to the waistline.

Flakey scones with blackberry jam

12 comments:

  1. " heavy enough to do serious damage if dropped from a height of six inches, and aerodynamic enough to stun an opponent at a distance if hurled from a sling."

    Hmmm... sounds like my cooking... :)

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  2. Hmmm, Scones. Not quite a biscuit, not quite a muffin. I'll take two please!

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  3. The picture alone makes me hungry.

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  4. One the one hand, a waist is a terrible thing to mind. On the other, indulging a bit once a week is worth it, I think.

    Jim

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  5. Nom nom. Another recipe for Sam to "inflict" on us.

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  6. My Mrs. recently discovered an interest in jam/jelly making. She's gotten really good at it. I'll have to give the Scones a try.

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  7. Cook's Illustrated had the most amazing tip for scones--or pie crust--freeze the stick of butter, then grate it and mix it in. None of this messing around cutting it in. It was one of those "slap self on forehead" moments--why didn't I think of that?!

    Hmmm...warm scone with lemon curd...excuse me, I must bake.

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  8. Look yummy! Trouble is getting that passage from Terry P out of my head anytime I come across one!

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  9. Why do you taunt me with such wonderful food when I can't eat it?
    Now I have to take the slobber of the computer screen.

    See Ya

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  10. Around here, scones are fried bread dough. Pair a warm one with honey butter and it speaks for itself.

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  11. Brigid, Those scones look scrumptious! Speaking of "Battle Foods," I've been trying my luck at making some Bannock recipes lately and having some pretty good results.

    On an unrelated note, I came across an amazing woman who makes custom grips for handguns using exotic woods. "Exotic Grips by Esmeralda."

    She has a set of custom 1911 grips with a unique "Celtic" checkering pattern on them and I immediately thought of you! :)

    You can check them out here: http://www.esmeralda.cc/1911_full_2.htm

    Here's a link to a close up photo: http://www.esmeralda.cc/sn29484.jpg

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  12. We had a cook make those for us when I was in the army.

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